Directory of Real Estate Agents

A Source For Advice on Buying and Selling Your Home

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Today’s buyers have more choices than ever before and that makes it way too easy for you to blend or worse yet . . .
Find yourself in a situation where the buyer has defaulted to price as the key component in their selection process.
In the absence […]


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Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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Browser Statistics
Browser Statistics – September 2012

The web browser statistics have been released through September 2012. The stats are published monthly at W3CSchools.com.

Below are the web browser stats for September 2012.

2012 IE9 IE8 IE7 IE6
January 5.3% 10.5% 3.1% 1.1%
February 5.7% 10.2% 2.6% 1.0%
March 6.1% 9.4% 2.5% 0.9%
April 6.4% 8.8% 2.3% 0.7%
May 6.5% 8.8% 2.1% 0.6%
June 6.1% 8.0% 1.9% 0.6%
July 5.9% 7.7% 2.0% 0.6%
August 6.1% 7.8% 1.8% 0.5%
September 6.6% 7.9% 1.3% 0.4%
2012 Firefox Chrome Safari Opera
January 37.1% 35.3% 4.3% 2.4%
February 36.6% 36.3% 4.5% 2.3%
March 36.3% 37.3% 4.4% 2.3%
April 35.8% 38.3% 4.5% 2.3%
May 35.2% 39.3% 4.3% 2.2%
June 34.4% 41.7% 4.1% 2.2%
July 33.7% 42.9% 3.9% 2.1%
August 32.8% 43.7% 4.0% 2.2%
September 32.2% 44.1% 4.2% 2.1%

Internet Explorer users are continuing to upgrade to the newer versions, as IE9 and IE8 are increasing while the numbers for IE7 and IE6 are steadily dropping. Firefox and Opera are also decreasing in popularity in favor of Chrome and Safari. It’s possible that the drop in numbers for Firefox could partially be due to the limited number of mobile devices that support Firefox.


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There are so many different styles of blogging that it can be hard to choose a style and stick with it for your company’s blog, especially if there are multiple people who update it. One popular method is the numbered list. Here are a few reasons that might explain why:

5. Readers know what they’re getting themselves into. With a small number like five, or even up to ten, readers are more likely to click on an article than a blog that promises hundreds. This is a fast-paced society and our attention span is no longer as easy to lure in. For those who really don’t have the time to read the entire article, the option of scanning the page for the titles of each item on the list is available. Limiting your range of examples to a small and finite number makes the reader feel like committing to reading the whole article is a manageable task.

4. Readers’ knowledge is challenged. Titles like “Five Most Common Cell Phone Problems” spark the readers’ curiosity and lead to more traffic. Many people who read the headline to a numbered list article are naturally going to try to name the five items on the list from memory. This leads to more clicks on the article as people want to check their facts. Just like when you’re watching a trivia game show with a group, there’s always someone who shouts the answers ahead of time or claims they knew the real answer all along.

3. Outlines are easy. Any writer will tell you that having an outline makes writing about any topic easier. Numbered lists are basically highly detailed outlines. Once the writer has come up with the five examples, only a paragraph is needed for each and the article practically writes itself.

2. Readers get hooked. By the time the reader reaches the halfway point in the article, it’s safe to say you’ve got them on the hook. Their curiosity will drive them to read the entire article because if they don’t, they’ll never know what the fifth example is. Then that’s all they will be able to think about for the rest of the day. If you want to test this theory for yourself, just stop reading this article right now. Number five is probably a dumb example anyway, right?  Just kidding. Don’t stop reading. In fact, we think you should read the rest of our blog articles too.

1. Writers seem like experts. Sure, there may be way more than five different shapes of swimming pools. However, by writing an article in the numbered list style, you’re saying to your readers, “These are the five shapes that matter. The rest are trivial.” By making this choice, you are asserting your opinion and subtly influencing your readers.  Sounding like an expert is key if you want your website to be effective in converting readers to customers.


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1)    Joining A Social Networking Platform And Then Hanging Out On The Sidelines: This one hits home with me because its how I quit both Linkedin and Twitter when I first started my “Castain 2.0” journey. I get this dopey “Alright I signed up now entertain me circus boy” vibe from people trying out social networking. […]


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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Do you think prospects have a natural tendency to doubt sales people?
Do you think they might be a little nervous to take a chance on something new . .
even if you’ve clearly articulated the value you bring to the table?
Here’s a thought . . .
You increase your ability to be believed when you prove the […]


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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D780 Devon & Jones Wintercept Fleece Full-Zip Jacket

Specifications: 100% microfilament polyester, plush, pill-proof, durable water-repellent technology, outside zip pocketsSize: S-XL (for 2XL-4XL add

Embroidery Areas: Upper left chest and upper middle back

Product Color: Navy

Embroidery Color: White and Green

Setup Charge: 0.00

Layout and Design: .00*

Shipping Weight: 10 lbs/10 shirts

Price Includes:

2 Color Embroidery**

2 Imprint Locations**

Digital Proof

FOB Gardner

Shipping Additional


D780DevonFleece

(Price Per Piece)

10 13 25 30
.24 .74 .74 .24
Terms: 50% Deposit. Balance due upon delivery. Most printed items are printed per “Standard Trade Practice”, meaning 10% over/under and billed accordingly.
*Layout and Design accounts for a half hour design time. Additional design time will be billed at our Standard Hourly Rate of 0/hr.
**For additional imprint location(s) and/or color(s) call for a quote.
NOTE: Prices are subject to change.

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Until you include recognition as a component!
Too many times, a manager will look at the base salary, the commission, bonuses and perks and think its all good . . .
Its NOT! And before I continue, let’s kill any feelings that I’m about to go into some rant about “worshiping the ground sales walks on” […]


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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Hope everyone is having a great Tuesday! Today happens to be National Boss’s Day so here’s the bossman with our tenth Tuesday Tip video. In just one minute, you can learn a great technique for website improvement from a web development expert for free. What are you waiting for?

If you’re just discovering our Tuesday Tips now, don’t worry about missing out. You can check out the tips from Tuesdays past with this playlist on our YouTube account. Be sure to subscribe to the inConcert Web Solutions channel for more great videos in the future!

Transcript:

Hey, everyone! Matt Ward with inConcert Web Solutions; I’ve got another great tip for you today.

You want to rank high on Google? Get those page names fixed!! Quit having a page name called Home.html… DOESN’T WORK!! It DOESN’T WORK!!! Everybody wants to show up for Home? Come on, REALLY??? You want to show up for…. If your website is based on peanut butter have peanutbutter.html, whatever the extension is. You need to name your URL after the content related to the page.

You also want it to kind of match your page title. Make sure everything is in sync. You know, your content matches your photos, your photos match your page name, your page name is your URL. Check out the photo right here on the screen shot and you can see exactly what the page name is.

For more great tips, go to inConcertWeb.com and click on the yellow button at the bottom; it says “Top 10 Tips”.


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How does one stand out in a sea of networking contacts?
Funny you should ask . . .
1)    Get on a committee at your local chamber with the goal of eventually chairing that committee. Doing so makes you a “go to” person which dramatically increases your visibility
2)    Show up consistently in any of the networking venues […]


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


© Paul Castain for Reliable Linking, 2012. |
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All Kinds of FriendsThe more time we all spend on Facebook, the more aware we become of certain behaviors from our online friends. There’s always the band guy who invites you to every gig he books, the sports fans who post a running commentary of every game they watch, the girl who is always posting photos of her awesome vacations, et cetera, et cetera. The same can be said of people who ‘like’ your page…

The Dutiful Family Member. This fan probably clicked ‘like’ out of a sense of obligation. Whether it’s your mom, your brother or even just a friend, they probably aren’t too interested in keeping up with your company’s Facebook updates. They get all the news they need from you, so don’t feel too bad if they don’t keep up online. Sometimes family members can be more active participants in your company’s social media conversations, but don’t expect them to become full-fledged promoters.

The Satisfied Client. This fan is a diamond in the rough. You’ve already convinced them somehow to give you their business, if they are a client. Now all you have to do is impress your client so they can’t wait to sing your praises from the rooftops. Every post from your company has the potential to go viral, so think about what kinds of posts your clients are likely to share, and whether their Facebook friends would be motivated to click the link and find out more about your business.

The Enthusiastic Chatterbox. This fan is pretty likely to be a client or a close friend. They post constantly on your behalf, talking about how wonderful your products are or how helpful your services are. These people are awesome and you can count yourself lucky whenever you encounter one! Try to keep them around, as these people are natural networkers and most likely can’t stop themselves from passing on a good referral.

The Silent Lurker. Most Facebook fans are likely to fall under this category. Some Facebookers prefer to browse their news feed without leaving a trace – no comments, no likes, no shares and no posts. Before you write everyone off as an introvert, though, keep in mind that Facebook doesn’t show all your fans every single one of your updates. The best way to promote interaction is to start interacting, so don’t forget to say hi to different fans every once in a while.

The One-Like-Stand. This so-called fan probably does not care about your Facebook updates and will probably never come to your page again. Sometimes their accounts are even fake. Don’t waste too much of your time collecting followers like this. Many of these people only find your page due to a promotion or sweepstakes promising them a prize or discount. When the promotion ends, their interest is gone. This is not to say that these people are totally useless. You might get through to one of their Facebook friends. Another possibility is that by attracting them in the first place, your brand is now slightly familiar to them. When shopping around, people are more likely to choose familiar brands. It’s not a surefire sales strategy but it certainly doesn’t hurt!

 


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