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Whether a client says it to your face, behind your back or simply thinks it, your offering is subject to . . .
How is this better?
What’s the difference between this and your competitor’s offering?
What’s the difference between this and simply doing nothing?
And perhaps even a “So what?” or three!
What’s a Jedi to do?
Here are 3 […]
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Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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A few months back, I was reading a really cool book called:  Mojo: How to Get It, How to Keep It, How to Get It Back if You Lose It by Marshall Goldsmith.
The author references an interesting study conducted by DDI where they found that the average American spends 15 hours per month criticizing or […]
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Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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1)    Use This Time For Some Of Your Internal Discussions: If you are continually bombarded with people who chew up your time at work, consider using your drive time for this. Doing this helps you maximize the time in your office and helps you stay on task.
One quick disclaimer: You’re not going to get ahead […]
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Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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I come across way too many sales professionals who only cling to one or perhaps two different ways of approaching prospects.
In today’s podcast we’re gonna “go there”!
We’ll start with how I define an effective sales mix and 4 solid reasons why you should consider it.
Next I offer several suggestions on how you can move beyond […]
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Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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Knowing what you want simply isn’t enough.  There are two types of people in this world – those who are interested in goals and those who are committed to goals.  If you are committed to goals, then you have goals that are written down and planned out.  You follow a system towards goal attainment.  You do whatever must be done today and every day, no matter what, and track  progress to avoid procrastination and unpleasant surprises.  Here’s the complete goal setting process:

“There is absolutely no doubt that people can permanently increase their success at work, at school, and at home.  They just need to be taught how,” states James P. Desrosiers, President of GROWTHco, a personal and professional development organization that specializes in goal achievement programs.  “When I was younger I knew WHAT was expected of me and WHAT I wanted for myself, my family, and my company.  What I didn’t know was HOW to get everything done that was on my plate or WHY I would want to in the first place.  In other words, I was never taught time management or self-motivation.  Now I have kids and clients and I see them struggling with success the same way I did.  That’s why I created my company and its programs that help people get real about their lives and achieve anything they truly desire.

“The first thing people need to understand is why some people achieve more than others.  Everyone has the same 24 hours in their day and how we choose to use our 24-hour days will determine our individual level of success.”

People must learn a process for taking any goal, in any area of their lives, and breaking it down into easy, individual steps that are scheduled and tracked through that goal’s completion.

The process as taught by GROWTHco explains that the first step is to identify the goal and establish a deadline.  The goal must be specific.  For a salesperson, that might be going from 00 to 00 per month in sales.  For a student, instead of “doing better in school”, it could be to go from a 77% average in English to an 87%.  The goal must also be attainable.  If you haven’t been to the gym in five years, set a goal to go once or twice a week to start.  The last component of any goal is that it must be measurable.  Make sure you can track progress along the way.  Establishing a deadline eliminates procrastination and creates a sense of urgency.

The second step is to determine motivation.  “Most people need to learn how to self-motivate.  85% of all goals that people have are given to them from other people, usually employers or teachers and parents.  In order for people to reach their maximum potential, they must first be able to find the personal motivation behind these goals.  They must answer the question – ‘No matter where this goal comes from, how will MY life improve from achieving this goal?’  People will only give 100% of their potential when they can tie in the personal gain to the goal that’s on their plate.  The motivation they uncover will create the attitude and passion that is necessary for them to give 100% of their energy and effort towards the goal.”

The third step is to identify and schedule the individual steps and behaviors required for goal achievement.  Again, time is limited.  All we get is 24 hours in each day.  Specific times must be scheduled to ensure that most important behaviors and activities are given the priority.  “We must first complete those behaviors and activities that will lead us to our goals before we do those that don’t.”

The fourth step is to think about any obstacles that may come up and determine how to succeed despite these obstacles.

The fifth step is to develop a tracking system like a chart, graph, or thermometer to gauge progress along the way.  People should share their tracking systems with others to gain valuable feedback and create accountability for their results.

This is a small part of just one session of GROWTHco’s Goal Achievement Program (GAP) for adults and Youth Success Program for Students.  Jim will work with you side-by-side, until goals are achieved.  While pursuing goals, clients learn the critical skills of goal setting and time management, including delegation, communication, avoiding interruptions, using technology effectively, planning, tracking, and focus.  It’s not a fluffy, no results coaching or motivational seminar, but a results oriented productivity program.  Contact James P. Desrosiers


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Now that you’ve determined your Key Content Theme, you need to figure out how you’re going to create all that content:

  • Who’s going to be writing the content?
  • Where’s the information for it coming from?
    • “Tribal knowledge” – the collective wisdom and experience of individual employees that may exist only in their heads
    • Existing literature – in-house as well as public sources such as other websites & trade magazines
  • Who’s going to gather and manage the information – the writer, the project manager, someone else?

Your content will only be as good as the information used to create it, so proper planning is important. Time and money is easily wasted if someone is not paying attention to where information is coming from, how current and accurate it is, and if it’s legal to use it.


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I’ve consulted with numerous organizations and trained and coached somewhere north of 3,000 sales reps over 27 years.
There’s one piece of advice that hasn’t changed much other than perhaps how I package the advice.
“Protect your culture”
BS starts with a single act . . . stop it at the door!
Greatness begins with a single act too […]
Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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I kind of feel like a representative of the “Dark Side” when I say that sometimes people can “feel our anger” in the words we write.
And if by chance you feel that the word “anger” is a tad strong, would you at least agree that people can tell when we might have the proverbial bug […]
Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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By now, you’ve probably heard the news that participating in Linkedin discussions is a great visibility strategy for you.

I thought it might be helpful to offer you a few guidelines that have served me well.

1)    Don’t Post And Run: By far one of the quickest ways to look like a tool. Call me crazy but I actually have this as one of our rules in my Linkedin group. Aside from bad manners, your discussion has a greater chance of dying and dropping off of page one which doesn’t do much for your visibility huh?

2)    Facilitate Your Discussion: You facilitate a discussion by:

–       Expanding on someone’s thought with a new one of your own.

–       Asking them to expand on their thought.

–       Asking them to give you an example.

–       Asking follow up questions

3)    Circle This One Please: Everyone Has A Story And Wants To Be Heard: So make sure you acknowledge the thoughts of the participants. Want to know a secret? People like to feel good by being acknowledged publicly. That’s how you get more and more people hunting down your discussions because they get to feel good all over again. How cool is that? Answer: Way cool!

4)    Enhance The Rock Stardom Of The Dudes/Dudettes In Your Network: Think about people in your network that have a particular area of expertise that can be invited. In some cases I would even talk them up before they get there. Do this (sincerely please) and you have a network of people who will jump into your discussions at the drop of a hat! Oh, before I forget, we should be doing this on any discussion we come across where we know someone who could add value . . . not just our discussions!

5)    When You Disagree . . . Do It Politely. A simple “Thank you for your input” is a nice neutral way of “not going there girlfriend”. But that’s common sense and everyone understands that in the groups. Right? Common sense is always commonly practiced!

6)    Don’t Let Others Diminish Your Virtual Real Estate: I’ve had only a few situations where I thought someone was going out of there way to be an A Hole. In those cases I brought it to the group manager’s attention so I didn’t have to play “Paul Castain Online Vigilante” Do that, and you become an A-Hole by association.

7)    Thank People: Online and offline. Who doesn’t like a little gratitude in front of thousands of their closest friends?

8)    Don’t Grade The Responses: In my coaching practice I always remind people to never grade the question when handling Q & A. Grading in this context would be if I tell Mary that her answer rocks and meanwhile I go silent on the other 12 responses. Way to tell everyone else they suck! Oh, and can we all stop with the “(fill in the name) nailed it” comments. Do this and you shut a discussion down real quick.

9)    Don’t Disguise A Sales Pitch As A Discussion: I despise this one. If you want a discussion, start a discussion but don’t mislead the participants. And those reply privately messages with the sales pitch is equally annoying. Why would someone come back to participate in your next discussion if you just conditioned them to have their guard up? Think Forrest. Think!

10) Don’t Start A Discussion To Blatantly Posture Yourself: I see this one a lot. The problem with posting a question and then going in to “coach” mode is that most people don’t like it because they didn’t ask for it. Certainly not in front of thousands.  Nuff said!

11) Don’t Over Post: It spreads you out way too thin (especially if you do this over multiple groups). Give your discussions a chance to breathe. I would keep it between 1-2 discussions each week depending on the volume of comments you get. To that end, only post one at a time dude!

Tip: Create a word doc with a list of discussions as you think of them. One way to get ideas is to think about the responses you get during a discussion. You might find a great opportunity for a follow up discussion.

Now if you’d like a PDF of these 11 tips plus 4 more, shoot me an email by clicking here and I will get one to you, no strings attached!

If you’d like a handy dandy PDF of these tips, drop me a line here and I’ll send you one. No strings attached!

Now get out there and facilitate!

Today’s News: If you’d like to have The Sales Playbook magically appear in your inbox like the other cool kids do, then by all means, click here and lets commence with your Jedi training!


Go to Sales Playbook
Paul Castain is the Vice President of Sales Development for Consolidated Graphics where he oversees the training and development of 700 sales Jedis.

Prior to working for Consolidated Graphics. Paul was the Director Of Corporate Solutions Sales for Dale Carnegie & Associates and the owner of two successful businesses.

Over the last 27 years, Paul has trained and mentored over 3,000 sales professionals, written sales training content for several Fortune 500 companies and is the author of Castain’s Sales Playbook (which just won a Sales Pop award for best sales website).


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If you tell yourself you hate something, then you will never enjoy success with it.  How is your attitude toward exercising?  Does it needs adjusting?  Here’s how:Assignment:  Write down all the pros of being healthy and the cons of being unhealthy.  Then, stop thinking of exercising as a negative and embrace it.  How often do you have alone time?  And enjoy the opportunities that exercise brings:  releasing stress, removing unhealthiness, gaining energy, looking better, feeling better, and ensuring your in top shape to achieve more of your ultimate potential.  Consider all the positive benefits instead and make it simply a non-negotiable automatic part of your day, like brushing your teeth.  Most importantly, proactively schedule it in your calendar to ensure it happens.  When you start exercising, start slow.  Yeah, it may be uncomfortable or hurt at first.  When it does, tell yourself this:  ”Pain is unhealthiness leaving my body”.  I actually enjoy discomfort (not necessarily pain!) as I view it as breaking through to my next level.  Success in business, in health, and in life depends on your positive attitude.  When you feel negative about something, exercise or not, stop…breathe…and adjust your attitude.  It’s critical to your success and your overall happiness in life.  And, yes, this blog was intended to be similar to my other blog about Winter.  I’d like to hear your comments.


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